IBC Teams With Purdue On Beryllium Oxide Nuclear Fuel

International Beryllium update for Its Beryllium Oxide Nuclear Fuel Research Project with Purdue University

 - By April Murelio -

International Beryllium Corporation (IBC) is pleased to provide an update on its collaborative research with Purdue University to develop a new type of longer lasting, more efficient and safer beryllium oxide nuclear fuel. The objective of the research is to develop for commercial use an enhanced uranium oxide beryllium oxide nuclear fuel for both current and future nuclear power reactors.

To promote its research work, the Company and Texas A&M University, working jointly with Purdue's School of Nuclear Engineering, recently attended a Light Water Reactor Sustainability ("LWRS") workshop in Atlanta, Georgia. Representatives were present from the national labs in Argonne, Idaho, Oak Ridge, Sandia and several educational institutes including MIT, Texas A&M and the University of Florida. Also attending were major energy utilities including Duke Power and TVA as well as the leading fuel manufacturers, Westinghouse and AREVA.

The purpose of the LWRS workshop was to draw individuals from across the nuclear spectrum together to present potential solutions for extending the service life of existing nuclear reactors. The conference focused specifically on how next-generation or modified nuclear fuels could contribute to a solution.

Dr. Sean McDeavitt of Texas A&M University presented information on uranium oxide - beryllium oxide (UO2 - BeO) dual oxide fuels to the attendees. The positives of the dual oxide fuel are that the BeO has a high probability of increasing the conductivity of the fuel by approximately 25%. The fuel is also being designed to power both current and next generation reactors and will be suitable for existing fuel cladding technology.

"We are very pleased with the progress of this joint research initiative," stated Ken Shasteen, IBC's Technical Director and coordinator of IBC's joint nuclear fuels research project. "Presenting at the LWRS was valuable, as all significant groups representing the nuclear power industry were in attendance and validated the premise that multi-oxide and BeO fuels will be the foundation of a more efficient, economically sound and safer nuclear power industry. We look forward to discussing our technology with the attending groups," continued Shasteen, "as we work to develop a commercial UO2 - BeO nuclear fuel for the benefit of our shareholders, power consumers and the nuclear power industry."

Existing work by Purdue nuclear engineers has shown that an advanced UO2 - BeO nuclear fuel could potentially save billions of dollars annually by lasting longer and burning more efficiently than conventional nuclear fuels while at the same time increasing demand for beryllium and beryllium oxide. In addition to the cost savings, an advanced UO2 - BeO nuclear fuel could also contribute significantly to the operational safety of both current and future nuclear reactors due to its superior thermal conductivity and associated decrease in risks of overheating or meltdown.

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  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    There is a small Canadian Company helping to fund this study. What is the company's name?

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    VERY INTERESTING.WILL ANOUNCEMENTS BE MADE AS PROGRESS IS MADE?

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    REgarding the Canadian company helping fund the BeO reserch  What is the name and is it the one Gates is involved in and could it be the stock exchange  IAALF

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    What happens afterwards - Be is very expensive and very toxic I think?

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    Dear April,

    How close is IBC, Purdue and Texas A&M University to completing Research on UO2-BO nuclear fuel?  I also found that they are working on a patent for this technology.   My internet research indicates that this new reactor fuel technology is very promising at increasing reactor fuel efficiency and reducing the probability of core melts in nuclear reactors due to BO high melting point (i.e., . greater than 2900 C melt temperature).  Could this technology also reduce large quantiies of hydrogen generation during loss of coolant accident/station blackout accident scenarios?  

    Thanks,

    Francis X. Talbot, PE

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    Office of New Reactors

    Quality and Vendor Branch A

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    beryllium oxide was discovered 70 years ago, and your just now getting around to producing this alloy...  why do I find that hard to believe.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In answer to jenalee yes IAALF in the correct stock symbol it's on the otcqx exchange.  Head quartered in vancouver CA.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    I was wanting to invest in the company that Byron King speaks about in his video.Is this it?