Video: Idaho Lab Program Simulates Fuel Rod Behavior Over Multiple Refueling Cycles

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Video: Idaho Lab Program Simulates Fuel Rod Behavior Over Multiple Refueling Cycles

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Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory are working on computer modeling technology with the potential to predict detailed fuel behavior and conditions inside a commercial reactor over multiple refueling cycles. The MOOSE (Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) program lets scientists develop predictive models in their specific fields in less time and without the assistance of computer science experts.

In this video, researchers use MOOSE and its affiliated programs to show the physical properties of fuel inside the Westinghouse AP1000 reactor over multiple years of use.

For more videos on the MOOSE project, check out the INL Youtube channel.

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  • To bad it took so long. What of the stress, fatigue and brittleness of current reactors that have been in service for decades, some beyond their engineered 30 year life expectations?

  • Hello, I work at INL and wanted to let you know that all the MOOSE videos are linked together in the playlist here:

    www.youtube.com/playlist

  • The first Anonymous doesn't seem to understand that this particular work involves fuel rods, not reactor vessel embrittlement, which is what he/she seems concerned about. Both topics have been studied for 60+ years, this new graphical supercomputing model just illustrating the latest tool. One quibble - the cladding in LWRs is zirconium alloy, not steel as the narrator states.